Why Bible Translation - 06
WHY BIBLE TRANSLATION
“If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head.

If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart”

Why Bible Translation

Nelson Mandela once said, If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his (own) language, that goes to his heart.” 

There are still up to 2,000 language groups waiting for God’s Word, that’s nearly 1.5 billion people – which is more than the amount of people on our very own continent of Africa.

God’s Word is living and active and is a powerful tool for us to connect with God. It is absolutely crucial that each person does not just understand the language of the Bible, but are also able to connect with it on a heart level. Then, every tribe, tongue, nation and language might have the opportunity to know the one true God.

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Translations

CD Cluster

CD Cluster

These four language groups live in an area where the dominant religion is not Christian. Availability of translated Scriptures will help to make the God of the Bible known in an environment where it is very challenging and dangerous to preach the Gospel. God has been faithful and has allowed Scripture production to proceed well despite the challenges.

Hambukushu

Hambukushu

A cross border group of about 60,000 people that reside in northern Namibia and Botswana. After years of making plans and dreaming about what a Bible translation could look like, the team published their first 43 oral and written passages in early 2020. They went on to complete a written translation of Genesis in 2021, which is now being distributed.

Himba

Himba

Deep in the heart of the Namibian desert live these nomadic cattle herders, a people group of about 50,000 people. They were unable to connect with God through the written text of the neighbouring Herero people. However, since 2015 many Bible passages have been orally translated into Himba and they are now in their third translation phase!

Huila Cluster

Huila Cluster

This cluster project is made up of the semi-nomadic Angolan communities of Handa, Cilenge, and Northwest !Xung speakers. With a shared vision and team work, these oral translations started in 2017. They completed 59 stories and 12 songs across the three language groups in phase 1, and plans are now underway to start phase 2!

Kamukuio Cluster

Kamukuio Cluster

The Kamukuio translation serves 3 language groups, all accessible from Kamukuio town in the southwest of Angola. Although the Kwandu and Humbe have been exposed to the Gospel, the Kuvale people had almost no believers or churches. Praise God that during 2021 phase 3 of translation was completed, and they are now moving to phase 4. 

Makhuwa

Makhuwa

Spread across the northern provinces of Mozambique is the eMakhuwa language group, covering about 1/3 of the population. After conducting research, the Catholic Church and other Evangelical churches found that transformation and mission required relevant narratives of God’s Word in their own languages. They're already seeing great impact!

Marenje

Marenje

The Marenje live in a tropical and mountainous region of Mozambique, just across the border from Malawi. In the churches, Scripture is always read in Portuguese or Chichewa and has to be translated into Marenje for them to understand it, so local church leaders have been asking for a Bible translation into this language. In early 2022 work finally began!

SA Sign Language

SA Sign Language

There are approximately 600,000 individuals in South Africa who use South African Sign Language (SASL) as their first language. More than 70% of these individuals are profoundly Deaf. To make the Bible available, a team of Deaf translators are working to translate the written English Bible into SASL in video format – a Visual Bible for the Deaf.

Sepulana

Sepulana

Mapulaneng is the "Place of the Mapulana people." This language community of 800,000 have lobbied to have Sepulana as an official language of Mpumalanga for years. Sepulana is one of 20 South African languages without a Bible translation, but the translation team are now preparing to start work on a translation of the whole New Testament!

Siphuthi

Siphuthi

Tucked in the mountains of Lesotho are the Siphuthi speaking people of about 43,000. They have maintained their language and culture, despite shifts around them, and have been in desperate need of a Bible translation. Despite people being told that it was not possible to translate God’s word in Siphuthi, they have already translated more than 40 narratives.

Phimbe

Phimbe

Coming Soon

Kiholo & Kisuku

Kiholo & Kisuku

Coming Soon

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